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How to bleed a radiator?

5 Answers

Answered by Maxflush Limited

11th August 2020

Maxflush Limited answered the question "How to bleed a radiator?"

Take care first, make sure the heating system is off and, ideally, allowed to cool. Next you need to identify the bleed points on the radiators and ensure they are accessible. Using a bleed key and a piece of kitchen roll, slowly open the bleed screw with the tissue underneath and you should hear the air being forced out past the bleed screw. Keep the tissue there until the air stops and liquid starts to dribble out of the point. You have now bleed that radiator. Do the same to all radiators and then check the system pressure as you may need to top back up.

Answered by D.A Gas, Heating & Plumbing

29th June 2020

D.A Gas, Heating & Plumbing answered the question "How to bleed a radiator?"

Turn off the boiler, heating and hot water. Grab yourself a radiator key and put it into the bleed point on the radiator and turn 1/2 turn anticlockwise, have a rag handy to catch any water. Once you have water appear from the bleed point close it using the key. Check the pressure on the boiler and restart the heating.

Answered by West 1 Gas and Plumbing Ltd

17th February 2020

West 1 Gas and Plumbing Ltd answered the question "How to bleed a radiator?"

Ideally turn off the boiler, radiators and the thermostats and allow system to cool. Hot water in the radiators will be under pressure, not ideal whilst bleeding. Locate the bleed valves, usually at the top corner/edge of the radiators. Have ready a some tissue to wipe up any drips. Use a radiator key to open valve until you hear air being released for the valve. This will be a noticeable "hissing" sound. Once water appears you know all the air has left the radiator, therefore turn the key to close the valve. Check your boiler's pressure gauge and top up were necessary via the filling loop. If in doubt consult a qualifed heating/gas engineer.

Answered by BPH - Blakemore Plumbing And Heating

8th February 2020

BPH - Blakemore Plumbing And Heating answered the question "How to bleed a radiator?"

The reason you would need to bleed a radiator is to remove air, you will be able to tell if there’s air in the radiator as the top of the radiator will be cool or cold while the bottom is hot. You will need to locate the bleed valve, generally on the top left or right of the radiator, on older style radiators it could be on the back. You will need a bleed key, place it into the valve and turn anti-clockwise. Have some adsorbent tissue/kitchen roll and place it under the hole the air is coming out of. Soon water will start coming out of the hole, when this happens close the valve back up, turning clockwise. The water maybe black or dirty so be careful not to get it on carpets. If you system is a pressurised system, com I or system boiler, you will need to depressurise the boiler afterwards. If you are unsure about repressurising the boiler call a Gas Safe registered engineer.

Answered by Cartwright and Hillyar Plumbing and Heating

30th January 2020

Cartwright and Hillyar Plumbing and Heating answered the question "How to bleed a radiator?"

first you need to find the bleed point. this is a small square ended screw. on new radiators it can be found at one end at the top of the radiator. older ones can be at the top on the rear of the panels. next you need a bleed key and some kitchen roll. locate the key on the screw and quarter turn anti clockwise holding the kitchen roll underneath to catch any water. once water comes out then the radiator is full and bled. depending on the type of heating system you may need to top up the pressure. it's worth while knowing that you can do this prior to bleeding the radiators, else the boiler could go into a low pressure fault mode. If in doubt find a local expert trades heating engineer.

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