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RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?

13 Answers

Answered by Elec-craft Electrical Services

14th September 2020

Elec-craft Electrical Services answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

RCDs, or residual current devices, are manufactured for a wide range of applications and vary in their current carrying capacity and their sensitivity to fault currents. The definition in BS7671 is 'Mechanical switching device designed to make, carry and break currents under normal service conditions and to cause the opening of the contacts when the residual current attains a given value under specified conditions.' It is a generic term that covers all devices including RCBOs. An RCBO is a residual current operated circuit-breaker with integral overcurrent protection. So it can perform additional functions of protection against overload and/or short-circuit. The correct terminology for the RCDs used for the divided sections on dual RCD CUs is RCCB. These are circuit breakers that don't have additional overload or short- circuit protection. So that's the difference.

Answered by Livewire Limited

24th March 2020

Livewire Limited answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

The main difference is that an RCBO is an MCB and RCD combined, so each circuit is protected individually, whereas an RCD protects a multiple of circuits and also requires MCB's, personally I prefer to use only RCBOs as this means if there is a fault on any one circuit it does not interfere with any other circuit

Answered by Lundie Electrical Ltd

29th February 2020

Lundie Electrical Ltd answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

An RCD (residual current device) detects the leakage of earth to any live conductors (line or neutral). The rating of an RCD, 63A for example, is not representative of the load at which it will trip. An RCD is not an over-current device. The rating is what current can safely pass through it and still allow the RCD to perform under fault conditions. An RCBO offers both over current and earth leakage protection. It is often considered the best method of protection and other benefits include ease of tracking a fault to a particular circuit.

Answered by AEI Electrical

16th December 2019

AEI Electrical answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

An RCD is a protective device that will protect a number of circuits, normally at least 5. If it picks up a fault on any of these circuits it will trip cutting the power to every circuit it is protecting. An RCBO is basically exactly the same as an RCD however it protects 1 individual circuit. If there is any problems then just that 1 circuit will loose power.

Answered by Carshalton Electrical Services

24th May 2019

Carshalton Electrical Services answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

A full RCBO consumer unit is preferable to a dual RCD consumer unit, because you when you have all RCBOs you only lose power to one circuit when there is a problem. Unlike with dual RCD consumer units, where you lose power to 50% of the circuits. Price difference is not as much if an issue these days as the prices of RCBOs has come down a lot. You can get Contactum RCBOs, which are a very good brand, for £13.35 each. A full RCBO board is a better more professional solution and it's the only type of board we install at Carshalton Electrical Services (07879887058).

Answered by GW Electrical & Security

21st May 2019

GW Electrical & Security answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

RCDs and rcbos both provide additional protection as required by BS7671. An 30mA rcd provides additional protection only, but typically to a number of circuits. An rcbo provides additional protection, overload protection and short circuit protection to a single circuit. Rcbos are preferred as, if they trip, they only isolate the faulty circuit, avoiding additional inconvenience to the occupier.

Answered by MAP Electrical

19th May 2019

MAP Electrical answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

In short they both offer additional protection RCD with protect a group of Circuits (MCBs), if there is a fault on one circuit the the RCD will trip switching off all the circuits under its protection. RCBOs will protect individual circuits, if there is a fault then only one circuit will switch off. The reasons RCBO's are not used is due to expense i.e RCD and MCBs usually come supplied with the consumer unit, where as RCBOs are bought seprately and can cost between £25-£30 each. In my opinion RCBO's are far better for installations

Answered by Infinity Electrics & Security Ltd

9th May 2019

Infinity Electrics & Security Ltd answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

An rcbo is used to protect a single circuit so if you have a problem with this circuit it will not affect any other circuit, generally an RCD will be used to control multiple circuits/mcb's (but not always) the problem with this is if there is a problem with one circuit it can mean the other circuits cannot be used, but it is a cheaper way to conform with regulations.

Answered by TB electrical

12th April 2019

TB electrical answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

The main difference is an rcbo is a mcb and an RCD combined in one device so each circuit is protected individually. Where as an RCD protects a number of circuits that all have there own mcb( miniature circuit breaker). Due to this rcbo's are the most expensive choice of the two but we'll worth having if cost isn't an issue.

Answered by GES Electrical

27th February 2019

GES Electrical answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

Rcbo’s are helpful in respect of failure. Only 1 circuit fails with rcbo’s and half or so fail with a rcd split board. The recommendation would be rcbo over spilt rcd’s. The cost is a little higher but in our recommendation a better option. Check you spark is registered with a cps scheme and you get the recorded that he will be covered with public liability insurance and hopefully experienced.

Answered by M.E.T Electrical Ltd

27th February 2019

M.E.T Electrical Ltd answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

An RCD provides additional protection against an electric shock. It works along side the circuit breakers for each circuit. An RCD usually provides addtional protection for a number of circuits, and will disconnect the power to them if a fault is detected. An RCBO provides the job of a circuit breaker and an RCD in one switch. This means that if a fault is detected, the individual circuit is 'tripped' and not a number of circuits.

Answered by Mojo Electrical Limited

9th February 2019

Mojo Electrical Limited answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

From a customers point of view. A consumer unit with RCBO’s will mean that under fault conditions they will only lose power to the circuit with the fault. A consumer unit being protected by typically 2 RCD’s will mean under fault conditions they will lose all the circuits protected by the RCD, potentially half the house. The RCBO consumer unit verses the RCD one is also more expensive but has the above advantages.

Answered by Edwards

8th February 2019

Edwards answered the question "RCBO vs RCD, what's the difference?"

Both devices are different forms of circuit protection. RCD Residual Current Device This device is typically 2 or 4 pole and monitors the outgoing circuits leakage to earth, virtually all electrical devices have leakage current, this is normal. Typical values are 30mA 100mA & 300mA A 30mA device typically trips (disconnects) at 20-23mA RCBO Residual Current circuit Breakers with Over current. These devices can offer protection from three types of fault, 1/ Overload 2/ Short Circuit 3/ Earth Leakage

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